Category Archives: Rebecca

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Thanks for a Wonderful Year!

The 2013-2014 Fellowship in Jewish Social Entrepreneurship has come to a close. We wish this year’s fellows – Abby, Eric, Marisa, Danielle, Jeremiah, Sarah, David, Charlene, Maddie, Morgan, and Rebecca – the best of luck on the next leg of their social change journeys! Please return here in the fall to celebrate the work and learning of next year’s fellows. In the meantime, below is a video that Eric produced for Global Green USA, highlighting their innovative approach to resource recovery.

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What’s Jewish about Adoption?

What about adoption is Jewish? And how does Judaism view adoption?

I pondered these questions last semester as I began work on a B’nai Mitzvah project for HelpUsAdopt.org, where I intern. The Development Director at HelpUsAdopt.org had previously worked on other B’nai Mitzvah projects and planned to create a Mitzvah project for HelpUsAdopt.org, and I asked to help.

HelpUsAdopt.org is a non-profit that provides grants of up to $15,000 to families and individuals looking to adopt, either domestically or internationally. HelpUsAdopt.org does not discriminate, define family, or charge an application fee, unlike other organizations. By providing grants, HelpUsAdopt.org not only helps parents create their families but also helps children in need find loving homes. All year long, as part of the Fellowship in Jewish Social Entrepreneurship, we have been asking ourselves “what’s Jewish about social justice?” While I already viewed my work at HelpUsAdopt.org as social justice work, and feel that social justice work is a central value of Judaism, I wanted to figure out how Judaism and adoption are directly connected. Thus, my research began.

At first, I had difficulty finding Jewish sources about adoption. My initial research provided general information about adoption in Judaism and showed me that adoption is definitely considered permissible but that Jewish leaders and scholars have not written much about it. However, I finally found sources providing concrete examples of adoption and its permissibility:

The Bible includes examples of cases in which legal guardians cared for orphans: Pharaoh’s daughter found and raised Moses, and Morchedai raised his cousin Esther. Pharaoh’s daughter and Mordechai took on the responsibilities of parents even though Moses and Esther were not born to them.

Tractate Sanhedrin 19b of the Babylonian Talmud states: “Now as to R. Joshua b. Korha, surely it is written, And the five sons of Michal the daughter of Saul whom she bore to Adriel. — R. Joshua [b. Korha] answers thee: Was it then Michal who bore them? Surely it was rather Merab who bore them! But Merab bore and Michal brought them up; therefore they were called by her name. This teaches thee that whoever brings up an orphan in his home, Scripture ascribes it to him as though he had begotten him.

”Exodus Rabbah 46:5 states: “he who brings up a child is to be called its father, not he who gave birth.”

These sources show that one can be a parent through adoption, and an adopted child is seen the same as a biological child; they explain how Judaism views adoption.

I looked to Biblical sources to figure out what is Jewish about adoption. The quote, “Be fertile and increase,” (more commonly cited as “Be fruitful and multiply”) can be seen in various places in the Bible, including Genesis 1:28, 9:1, and 9:7. Those who cannot have children through natural means can fulfill this mitzvah by having children through adoption. The Bible also warns us not to mistreat widows or orphans (Exodus 22:21-22). This implies that we should take care of widows and orphans, and adoption is one method of caring for orphans.

By doing this research for the B’nai Mitzvah project, I gained a better understanding of the Jewish values associated with adoption, and I confirmed that adoption is allowed and supported in Judaism. The knowledge I gained through my research validates my work at HelpUsAdopt.org as a form of Jewish Social Justice (and helps me see the Jewish elements of my personal experience – please see my previous blogpost at: http://blog.jtsa.edu/changemakers/2013/09/18/adoption-for-all/).

For more information, here is a link to HelpUsAdopt.org’s website: http://helpusadopt.org/. This is the basic kind of information I found about Judaism and adoption during my initial research (before I found the sources quoted above): http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Judaism/adoption.html

The fall semester has come to an end and we want to thank our fellows for their amazing work! As Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel said, “we pray through our feet.” This year’s fellows have been marching for change through the important action, reflection, and connection they’ve engaged in through the Fellowship in Jewish Social Entrepreneurship. We look forward to next semester as these JTS changemakers continue to pursue justice.

Check out photos from our semester here:

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Adoption for All

Social justice. Everyone has a different idea of what this term means, and no single definition can fully express its meaning. Helping those in need, pursuing equality, seeking fairness, and working to make the world a better place can all be considered aspects of social justice. During our orientation for the Fellowship in Jewish Social Entrepreneurship, Dean Aliyah Vinikoor presented this definition, from the Social Justice Symposium at the University of California, Berkeley:

Social Justice is a process, not an outcome, which (1) seeks fair (re)distribution of resources, opportunities, and responsibilities; (2) challenges the roots of oppression and injustice; (3) empowers all people to exercise self-determination and realize their full potential; (4) and builds social solidarity and community capacity for collaborative action.

This semester, all of us in the Fellowship are interning at organizations that do some form of social justice work, and I’m hoping that we all learn and grow from contributing to this process.

I am interning at Helpsusadopt.org, whose mission statement reads:

HelpUsAdopt.org is a national non-profit 501(c)(3) financial assistance grant program providing qualified couples and individuals -regardless of race, ethnicity, marital status, gender, religion, sexual orientation, or disability- with grants of up to $15,000 towards their domestic, international, foster, or special needs adoption expenses.

The costs of adoption are staggering, ranging from $30,000 to $50,000 if not more, including but not limited to the costs of a home study, travel fees, legal fees, agency fees, and placement fees. HelpUsAdopt.org raises the funds for grants from donations, events, and the sale of jewelry and tote bags; all of the profits from the sale of merchandise go to HelpUsAdopt.org. This organization’s work creates families, helping children in need find homes and helping adults who long to become parents, and they are the only organization that provides grants without discrimination and does not charge a fee to apply. Providing families with the resources to adopt without discrimination, advocating for adoption reform, and promoting awareness of the problems and needs of potential adoptive parents are some of the ways that HelpUsAdopt.org is a part of the social justice process, as defined above.

Adoption is an issue personally important to me. My little brother is adopted, and now I cannot imagine life without him. He’s four, and I love spending time with him. His sense of humor, his love of sports and superheroes, and his love of Harry Potter (my personal favorite) are some of his special characteristics but I still cannot explain what he means to me. Although my family was fortunate enough to be able to afford adoption, others are not, and it saddens me that they cannot experience the joy that I do simply because of financial obstacles.

HelpUsAdopt.org represents a way for these families to get something like what I have. And it represents a way to provide a better life for children in need. To date, HelpUsAdopt.org has helped 81 families adopt. I am so grateful to have this opportunity to work with an organization that makes such a difference in people’s lives.

If you would like to know more about HelpUsAdopt.org, please visit http://HelpUsAdopt.org/testimonials.html. Here are two more great articles about HelpUsAdopt.org: http://HelpUsAdopt.org/Word/People_Sept2011.pdf and http://edition.cnn.com/2011/US/05/19/cnnheroes.becky.fawcett/