Environmental Justice Field Trip

Last Friday the Fellowship went on an environmental justice field trip to visit Greyston Bakery and Rocking the Boat. We spent the gorgeous day outdoors and learning from these innovative organizations about how they affect change and address environmental injustices in their local communities.

Environmental justice is the movement that focuses on building healthy communities in the areas most affected by environmental health threats – consistently poor communities of color. Environmental justice activists are committed to increasing accessibility to clean air, green spaces, good food, and green jobs. In doing so, they attempt to redress generations of environmental racism and poverty. To learn more about environmental justice work in the South Bronx, read Fellows’ blog post from last year. 

Founded in 1982, Greyston Bakery was one of the first social enterprises in the country. As the supplier of all the Ben & Jerry’s brownie chunks, their commitment to social good is reflected in their tagline: “We don’t hire people to bake brownies. We bake brownies to hire people.” They serve their local Yonkers community through a number of innovative programming, such as an open hiring policy, workforce development training, and affordable housing. Greyston has a strong commitment to the environment as well – solar panels power the plant, they source fair-trade ingredients, and have implemented green operations such as single-stream recycling and a rooftop garden. Their foundation also maintains 19 community gardens to provide fresh produce to their employees and the surrounding area.

Rocking the Boat is a youth development organization based in the Hunts Point section of the South Bronx – historically, one of the poorest and most polluted areas of the country. They use traditional wooden boatbuilding and on-water education to empower teens and restore the Bronx River. We got to tour their facility and learn about the history of the organization before hitting the water ourselves! Once on our boats, we learned about the efforts that Rocking the Boat together with other local green organizations, such as the Bronx River Alliance, are making to clean up the Bronx River, revive the indigenous ecosystem, and increase community access to the river. (We also developed some mean upper body strength by rowing against the river’s current).

It was inspiring to meet with each organization and learn about the social good they create in their local communities. We look forward to our next field trip – in the meantime, please enjoy our slideshow!

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Dare to Use the F-Word

I’ve never exactly considered myself a feminist, per sé – I mean, I’m all for equal pay for equal work, and I cherish the opportunity I’ve been given to receive a quality education regardless of my preferred gender pronoun, but a bra-burning man hater? Not quite my thing. And yet, a recent visit to our Fellowship in Jewish Social Entrepreneurship by Pippi Kessler, Program Director for Ma’yan, engaged me with a feminist perspective that I had yet to consider.  Ma’yan “provides feminist, social justice, and leadership training to teen girls and teaches vital skills to parents and educators,” and their statement of vision and values includes the monumental task of “striv[ing] to make our community and the wider world a better place for girls and women [and] envision[ing] a society where young people of all gender identities are supported and taken seriously by adults.”

Along those lines, we began our session with an activity designed to enhance our awareness of “male” privilege.  I say male with a bit of hesitation, because as we quickly realized, the array of privileges being described could often only be attributed to heterosexual, cisgender males.  Nevertheless, as we read the various statements aloud, I noticed, quite uncomfortably, how gendered the language was, how much I identified with many of the statements, how frustrated I felt as a woman.  Of course I was discouraged by the continued disparities between men and women that span both personal and professional life, but what angered me more was not the inequalities themselves, but rather, the underlying attitudes in our society that continue to perpetuate these pervasive inconsistencies.  As the conversation continued, we discussed various methods of change, from enacting large-scale procedures and policies, to modifying our lived behaviors, values, and beliefs.  I began to realize that though expansive gender equality legislation is essential, for maximum effect it is crucial to engage in honest, thoughtful dialogue at a personal level.

Which led us to the next part of the program.  After a passionate discussion about our initial understandings of gender inequality, Pippi screened for us raw footage of one of Ma’yan’s latest projects – in their programming specifically geared towards teenage girls, the current topic of conversation revolves around sexism in the media.  The unrealistic, and often unhealthy, expectations of young women in American society largely stem from the vast media culture in which the majority of Americans revel.  Young girls, now more than ever, face an increasingly-sexualized prepubescent existence; crop tops and miniskirts fill the racks of “tween” clothing stores, Miley Cyrus’ and Katy Perry’s “sexcapades” provide the soundtrack for their lives, and beauty regimens and fad diets are increasingly marketed exclusively for, and directly to, teenage girls.  And yet, when asked about how this affects their own beliefs and values, the teens honestly and thoughtfully linked their self-esteem and mental health with the barrage of media aimed at promoting an impossible standard by which young women strive tirelessly to achieve.  Furthermore, the participants in this film were not solely Jewish, and though Ma’yan is a Jewish organization, creating a space in which both Jewish and non-Jewish girls are able to engage with these difficult issues provides a key link between feminism as both a Jewish value, based on our sacred texts and fundamental practices, as well as an American value of equality of opportunity for all.

Issues of gender are often discussed on our campus (the bold, beautiful Barnard women and their equally bold and beautiful Columbia counterparts make sure of it), but never had I experienced the conversation in quite this way.  Our cohort’s conversation with Pippi was indicative of the intention of the Fellowship program – contemplating larger issues in American society through a distinctly Jewish lens, and understanding how this enlightened perspective allows us to go forth with a renewed sense of purpose in our social justice work.  My own work with AVODAH: The Jewish Service Corps is another example of this interplay in action.  AVODAH: The Jewish Service Corps “strengthens the Jewish community’s fight against the causes and effects of poverty in the United States by engaging participants in service and community-building that inspire them to become lifelong leaders for social change, whose work for justice is rooted in and nourished by Jewish values.“  In addition to the Service Corps program, AVODAH has created a new Fellowship for Jewish early career professionals working to alleviate poverty in the United States, where participants are given mentorship, training, community, and networking opportunities to enhance their work and encourage leadership in Jewish social justice.  (Plug for both programs – check them out here! http://www.avodah.net/apply/ and http://www.avodah.net/fellowship/)  Both of these programs provide unique experiences for young Jews committed to social justice to learn both from each other and the populations with which they work, and facilitate a deeper understanding of how Judaism can, and should, play a role in their social justice efforts.

I walked away from our meeting with Pippi unbelievably inspired. Our Fellowship cohort has had discussions about “What’s Jewish about Social Justice” and how our work is influenced and informed by Jewish values, but seeing how those conversations are put into action by Ma’yan, AVODAH, and other similar organizations has given me a renewed sense of purpose in my own social justice journey.  I know these incredibly meaningful conversations will continue to enrich our Fellowship experience.

To learn more about sexism in the media – and the ways women and girls are constructing counter-narratives – check out PBS’s Makers project, where you can watch groundbreaking media educator Jean Kilbourgh, whose work inspired Ma’yan’s teen filmmakers. For work happening close to home, The Barnard Center for Research on Women puts on symposia and events to link feminist research and practice and the Women’s Media Center makes women visible and powerful in the media. 

To take action yourself, join feminist artist Suzanne Lacy on the streets of Brooklyn this weekend as part of a large-scale performance art and community organizing event: http://creativetime.org/suzannelacy/

Fatherhood in Progress

“My kid calls his mother’s boyfriend ‘dad,’” an impassioned father, let’s call him D., recounts. “He calls him ‘dad’ and he tells him he loves him.”

We were in the midst of a fatherhood workshop at the Midtown Community Court.  D’s thoughts were in response to an open prompt that the facilitator had posed to the group of fathers about their experiences with what we refer to as “co-parenting.”  For single fathers looking to be involved in their child’s life in real ways, co-parenting presents a host of challenges.

D. continued, “But when I met with the judge, she says to me, ‘Sir, isn’t the more people that loves your son, the better?’ I was like, whoa.  She got me.  That’s what it’s about.”

From here, another of the dads, R., weighed in:“But that’s your kid. You don’t want him calling someone else ‘daddy’!”

D had the final word as myself, the social workers on staff, and the other five dads participating in the group, looked on: “But it doesn’t matter.  During any of the stuff I’ve got going on with his mom, and there’s a lot of stuff, he’s what matters.  Having people love him has to be what matters.”

This fatherhood workshop, called 24/7 Dad, is part of a six weeklong Fatherhood & Workforce Training Program run out of the Midtown Community Court and the Center for Court Innovation.  Elements of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), concrete skills such as interviewing and resume building, and practice with social skills and emotional management, are incorporated into the program’s daily schedule.  As an intern for the program through List College’s Fellowship in Jewish Social Entrepreneurship, I’ve been able to watch many moments unfold like the one recounted above.  In observing the back-and-forth between the dads during sessions, and in sitting down with many of them individually, I’ve been struck by the common threads that bind one story to the next, and one father to the next.  Upbringings with absent or abusive fathers, youths interrupted by daily stop-and-frisk police profiling, entire neighborhoods struggling to make ends meet – these elements come up over and over, which is part of why these sessions can be so normalizing and therapeutic for the dads: it is comforting, on some level, to be understood intuitively by others.

But attitudes toward parenting differ considerably among the dads, and not only when it comes to the role of male figures in their children’s lives.  The fatherhood workshops unearth a wide array of philosophies on masculinity, what it means to be a good father, role modeling, discipline, and so on.  I’ve heard articulations of fatherhood that could have been taken right off the page of any mid-20th century conservative family values guidebook, for all their heteronormative, patriarchal, corporal punishment-supporting ideals.  But I’ve also heard robust defenses of egalitarian marriages, rants about parents who spank their children, and hopes for a time when they could express their emotions openly with their partners and children without being made to feel like less of a man.  For me, it’s been an important reminder that it is not only those in the ivory tower who worry about a generation of children growing up fatherless, but also the fathers themselves.

The alternative sanctions, rehabilitation, mental health services, and workforce training programs that operate out of the Midtown Community Court, do so out of a recognition that the criminal justice system is flawed.  Longstanding systemic barriers contribute to the justice system’s revolving door; many of the same men and women enter and leave the courts, only to re-enter again later on – all without acknowledgment of the many root causes of their behavior and the many hurdles in their way.

In Midtown’s conception of what positive outcomes look like, and in their methodology for reaching them, I hear reverberations of Judaism’s sense of pragmatism and empathy.  In the canon of Jewish text, we find more than an enumeration of laws, case verdicts, and principles.  We find guidelines for how to mitigate between the world as it is encoded and the world as it is lived, and as Jews, we have communally internalized the fact that reality does not always match the ideal.  Systems do not always work.  Halakha (Jewish law) self-consciously and continuously accounts for the fact that it is a lived system, lived out by flawed humans, and that provisions must be made for an imperfect reality. Even what is ‘beyond’ the system is made room for within the system.   Any philosophy that contains a special Birkat HaMazon (Grace After Meals) for Yom Kippur, a day when in theory no one is eating at all, must necessarily extend the same dose of practicality to all human beings’ complex realities.  I feel it is my obligation to recognize these shortcomings, work within my capacity to make society more just, and above all, seek to understand the particular circumstances of each individual from a place of dignity and humanity.

For more information about these programs and other innovative programs being run out of the Midtown Community Court, visit: http://www.courtinnovation.org/project/midtown-community-court.This year the Midtown Community Court celebrates it’s 20th anniversary. To learn more about its inception, watch this video with John Feinblatt, senior advisor to New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and founding director of the Midtown Community Court.

To get involved in the intricately related and unjustly pervasive issue of “Stop and Frisk,” through a Jewish avenue, see Jews for Racial and Economic Justice’s initiative: http://www.jfrej.org/campaign-police-accountability

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Filmmaking to Save the Planet

We often think of environmental consciousness and sustainable living as an amalgam of gallant wind-farms, sleek hybrid cars, and perhaps a few melting ice caps. Certainly, recycling is also on the mind, and post-consumer waste products have increasingly become a regular sight from tissues to coffee cups. All of this is admirable and arguably a step in the right direction. They move individuals towards lifestyles in which consumption produces resources instead of waste. On the other hand, critics of such behavior might contend that individual action cannot consequentially impact the immense systems of production and supply that tend to generate waste on the large scale- hazardous or otherwise.

Though not entirely true, such criticism has some merit. New York City alone generates and exports 15,000 tons of waste daily, which finds its way to distant landfills. This translates to a number of negative side-effects, including $450 million a year in disposal costs and the air pollution from trash-hauling trucks. Clearly, this problem exceeds the capabilities of the individual alone.

My placement organization through the FJSE is Global Green’s Coalition for Resource Recovery (CoRR). The Coalition a solution to this problem through waste diversion, a strategy that looks for methods in which wasted resources might be integrated as materials into new or existing supply streams. This covers a range of familiar areas, including efforts to turn commercial food waste into nutrients via composting. Another large-scale effort focuses on commercial food packaging, wherein the Coalition has worked towards replacing wax-lined good crates with a variety more easily recyclable.

I’ve noticed thus far that the strength of the organization lies in its broad network of affiliates and interested parties. In our efforts, such as those addressing commercial food packaging, the Coalition engages companies from all points in the supply line and across the country. For example, New Orleans Fish House, a seafood supplier, recently showcased the use of a new box produced by another CoRR company: Interstate Resources. The Coalition includes paper mills that specialize in turning the waste from such boxes into further resources.

As the Media and Communications Intern at CoRR, my primary work has been to help document, on video, the organization’s recent successes and developing work. The ultimate goal of this work is not archival. Rather, every December, Global Green holds a gala at which its various sub-organizations (CoRR included) showcase their work. My task, then, is to render CoRR’s work into the form of one, or several, short documentaries.

Beyond the gala, I feel that such communication is vital for this organization and environmental initiatives in general. In my experience, the lack of widespread mobilization around the environmental crisis is due in part to a dearth of communication with the general public. The complexity of such a large-scale issue easily swallows any human story, if allowed to. I aim to highlight the human work at the heart of change at CoRR. In doing so, I hope that the public can grasp more effectively the scope of the problems we face as a consumptive society. More importantly, however, I don’t want to disparage anybody. Instead, I want to communicate that individual actions, if enacted in concert with those of others, can indeed affect great change.

Though there’s not much to show as of yet (our primary project this year is still in its adolescence), there’s quite a bit to read and learn already. To learn more about NYC’s unique capacity for waste-turned resources, visit  “NYC Opportunity”  on CoRR’s website. As an example of just part of our search for better boxes, you can check out an early field trip we took to test some out at a nearby farm. Finally, you might not be a packaging tycoon or restaurant owner, but you can still enact your own waste-diversion programs. Beyond paper and plastic, e-waste is a resource waiting to be tapped, even by the CoRR. NYC’s Department of Environmental Conservation hosts an E-waste Recycling guide here, for your perusal. 

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Adoption for All

Social justice. Everyone has a different idea of what this term means, and no single definition can fully express its meaning. Helping those in need, pursuing equality, seeking fairness, and working to make the world a better place can all be considered aspects of social justice. During our orientation for the Fellowship in Jewish Social Entrepreneurship, Dean Aliyah Vinikoor presented this definition, from the Social Justice Symposium at the University of California, Berkeley:

Social Justice is a process, not an outcome, which (1) seeks fair (re)distribution of resources, opportunities, and responsibilities; (2) challenges the roots of oppression and injustice; (3) empowers all people to exercise self-determination and realize their full potential; (4) and builds social solidarity and community capacity for collaborative action.

This semester, all of us in the Fellowship are interning at organizations that do some form of social justice work, and I’m hoping that we all learn and grow from contributing to this process.

I am interning at Helpsusadopt.org, whose mission statement reads:

HelpUsAdopt.org is a national non-profit 501(c)(3) financial assistance grant program providing qualified couples and individuals -regardless of race, ethnicity, marital status, gender, religion, sexual orientation, or disability- with grants of up to $15,000 towards their domestic, international, foster, or special needs adoption expenses.

The costs of adoption are staggering, ranging from $30,000 to $50,000 if not more, including but not limited to the costs of a home study, travel fees, legal fees, agency fees, and placement fees. HelpUsAdopt.org raises the funds for grants from donations, events, and the sale of jewelry and tote bags; all of the profits from the sale of merchandise go to HelpUsAdopt.org. This organization’s work creates families, helping children in need find homes and helping adults who long to become parents, and they are the only organization that provides grants without discrimination and does not charge a fee to apply. Providing families with the resources to adopt without discrimination, advocating for adoption reform, and promoting awareness of the problems and needs of potential adoptive parents are some of the ways that HelpUsAdopt.org is a part of the social justice process, as defined above.

Adoption is an issue personally important to me. My little brother is adopted, and now I cannot imagine life without him. He’s four, and I love spending time with him. His sense of humor, his love of sports and superheroes, and his love of Harry Potter (my personal favorite) are some of his special characteristics but I still cannot explain what he means to me. Although my family was fortunate enough to be able to afford adoption, others are not, and it saddens me that they cannot experience the joy that I do simply because of financial obstacles.

HelpUsAdopt.org represents a way for these families to get something like what I have. And it represents a way to provide a better life for children in need. To date, HelpUsAdopt.org has helped 81 families adopt. I am so grateful to have this opportunity to work with an organization that makes such a difference in people’s lives.

If you would like to know more about HelpUsAdopt.org, please visit http://HelpUsAdopt.org/testimonials.html. Here are two more great articles about HelpUsAdopt.org: http://HelpUsAdopt.org/Word/People_Sept2011.pdf and http://edition.cnn.com/2011/US/05/19/cnnheroes.becky.fawcett/

FJSE 2013-2014

Welcome 2013-2014 Fellows!

Welcome back List College students!

Today is the first day of classes at JTS, but the 2013-2014 participants in our Fellowship in Jewish Social Entrepreneurship are already hard at work. The 10 fellows moved back on campus early for an intensive day-long training before classes began – and many of us have already started at our internships.

We look forward to sharing our experiences with you throughout the year. In the meantime, here’s a sneak peek into what we’ll be doing as fellows:

Abby, intern with Midtown Community Court, will be spending the year with Time Square Inc. to provide support and facilitate social, emotional, and life skills groups for formerly incarcerated men

Charlene will be interning with Border Crossers, an organization that provides racial justice training for NYC educators

Danielle, intern with the Leadership Action Network, is going to use social-media platforms to raise awareness around Israeli social justice and environmental movements

David will be continuing his internship with Alcoa Inc., to help direct corporate social responsibility for the world’s third-largest producer of aluminum foil

Eric, intern with Global Green USA, will be generating multimedia content for the environmental organization’s resource recovery campaign

Maddie will be interning with The Advocacy Lab, facilitating human rights trainings in public school classrooms

Marisa, intern with AVODAH: The Jewish Service Corps, will be working in their development department to increase grants and individual donations

Morgan will be interning at the New York Botanical Gardens, planning special events and exhibits to support environmental education and community development

Rebecca, intern with HelpUsAdopt.Org, will be doing PR and admin work to help break down barriers to adoptions for all parents no matter race, creed, or sex

Sarah will be interning with The Advance Group, helping the progressive lobbying and political PR company with local and national campaigns

Thanks for a Great Year!

The 2012-2013 Fellowship in Jewish Social Entrepreneurship has come to a close. We wish this year’s fellows – Sara, Ari, Deborah, Sam A, Mirit, Dafna, Ariela, David, Sam S, and Allison – the best of luck on the next leg of their social change journeys! Please return here in the fall to celebrate the work and learning of next year’s fellows. In the meantime, below are some photos from our environmental justice tour of the South Bronx for your enjoyment. We spent a wonderful day hearing from local activists from The Point about their experience greening their community – and helped out on their urban farm.

To learn more about environmental justice issues in the South Bronx, visit The Point - a grassroots organization dedicated to youth development and the cultural and economic revitalization of Hunts Point. Sustainable South Bronx and Rocking the Boat are two other local powerhouses working to advance environmental justice while empowering young people to take a lead in their own community.

 

Participatory Budgeting

Ever wish YOU could decide how your tax dollars were spent? Increasingly, communities across the country are getting the chance to do just that through new “participatory budgeting” initiatives.

Improving communities on a hyper-local level, participatory budgeting efforts are usually spearheaded by a city-legislator to increase civic engagement and help self-direct community development. New York City residents in eight different council districts are able to vote on how their tax dollars should be put to use. This year, 13,000 New Yorkers have already used the opportunity to reinvigorate democracy through this hands-on budgetary process - so far, 45 winning projects have been awarded $9.4 million.

For more information, watch this new video from the Participatory Budgeting Project:

http://vimeo.com/65169312#

WHAT We Do and HOW We Do It

How do you build effective, innovative, and sustainable organizations? Our friend Nigel Savage, Executive Director of Hazon, outlines what he’s learned in the Jewish food justice organization’s first thirteen years. It may seem obvious, but he says the key to success is WHAT we do and HOW we do it.

I founded Hazon as someone who was – and still is – fundamentally an idealist. The word hazon means “vision,” and I continue to believe that vision counts for a great deal in changing the world for good. But as each year has gone by I have become steadily more interested in a wide range of organizational issues: a series of internal cultural attributes that have gradually become true of Hazon and that I believe account for some of our success, such as it is, these last thirteen years. As we continue to plan for the future sustainability of the organization, I have outlined a few factors that have helped Hazon advance organizationally.

His tips for other idealists hoping to maximize organizational impact:

  • Connect a large vision with incremental steps
  • Leverage key partnerships and relationships
  • Focus on systems
  • Deeply commit to iterative excellence
  • Engage in learning, of all sorts

What do you think? Do you know of other organizations that have developed best practices to connect their vision and internal operations?

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FTK – For The Kids

Every day is typically the same routine – wake up, get dressed, eat breakfast, attend classes and meetings, eat lunch, go to work, do homework, eat dinner, shower and sleep. I find that we are so caught up in our own lives that we don’t necessarily stop to think of others or appreciate the small things in life until a traumatic event or school fundraiser occurs. This is exactly what I have been struggling with all year as I participate in the Fellowship in Social Justice Entrepreneurship, through which I’ve been interning at Kids in Distressed Situations, Inc. (K.I.D.S.) since September.

K.I.D.S. is a non-profit organization that distributes new brand-name products to children and families suffering from abuse, illness, natural disasters, and poverty. We offer partner agencies a 10:1 ratio of product for every dollar donated. This semester my main responsibility at K.I.D.S. involves grants—learning how to write letters of intent and apply for specific grants. I research foundations and the grants they offer, begin establishing a partnership with the foundation, and start working on the grant application process. The grants we receive support our cause and our programs. Since our founding in 1985, K.I.D.S. has donated almost $1 billion worth of new merchandise to 70 million children and families in need across the United States and abroad. This is an extraordinary accomplishment of which I am proud to be a part; however, our efforts and work just doesn’t seem like it’s enough.

According to a report by NPR, fifteen percent of the U.S. population, meaning 46.2 million individuals, live below the federal poverty line. How can I buy a new dress or a cupcake or see a Broadway show when there are millions of people who could use that money for basic necessities such as clothes, food, shelter, education, and baby products? How can I indulge in certain luxuries after I read thank you notes from children and families who received diapers or a new pair of shoes from K.I.D.S.?

To be honest, there’s no real answer. Living a life full of guilt is no life at all, but living a life full of appreciating what you have and helping those in need is a different story. Through my internship with K.I.D.S., I hear and read about stories of young kids who see families and children suffer in the news or in their local community. These kids have then turned to their parents and ask what they can do to help. Many have organized product drives and fundraisers. Others have asked their family and friends to make a donation to K.I.D.S. in honor of their birthday rather than giving them a present. I have been so inspired by these children and my work at K.I.D.S. that I have learned the question to ask is not, “How can I not feel guilty?” but rather “How can I get people involved in our cause?” Organize a fundraiser, hold a product drive, spread the word, or volunteer. Help us expand our partnerships with foundations and local agencies, and help us expand the communities we reach. Support our cause and make a difference in the lives of millions of individuals. After all, it’s for the kids.

In its 28 years, K.I.D.S. has provided nearly $1 billion  to 70 million children. For more information, visit our website at http://www.kidsdonations.org/. Follow @kidsdonations