Tag Archives: FJSE

Ending LGBTQ Youth Homelessness

Did you know that up to 40% of the homeless youth population is gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender?

Our friend, Dr. Jama Shelton, outlines her vision for ending LGBTQ youth homelessness on The Huffington Post today. SPOILER ALERT: it involves organizing a national movement.

To learn more, head on over to Forty to None where Dr. Shelton serves as Executive Director. And, yes, it was started by that Cyndi Lauper.

Is the Way We’re Going About Tzedakah “Dead Wrong”?

A new TEDTalk, by activist and fundraiser Dan Pallotta, has gone viral this week.

Activist and fundraiser Dan Pallotta calls out the double standard that drives our broken relationship to charities. Too many nonprofits, he says, are rewarded for how little they spend — not for what they get done. Instead of equating frugality with morality, he asks us to start rewarding charities for their big goals and big accomplishments (even if that comes with big expenses). In this bold talk, he says: Let’s change the way we think about changing the world.

Everything the donating public has been taught about giving is dysfunctional, says AIDS Ride founder Dan Pallotta. He aims to transform the way society thinks about charity and giving and change.

Over at Tablet Magazine, Marjorie Ingall thinks it’s our culture of giving at a distance that needs to change. This approach to tzedakah is developed from a young age, she asserts in “Doing Mitzvah Projects Right.” Ingall calls on the Jewish community to encourage b’nai mitzvah to forgo meaningless fundraising “mitzvah projects” and really get their hands dirty. “Don’t just ask for donations at your bar or bat mitzvah,” she says. “Do some homework and find a cause with meaning.”

What do you think? Does the Jewish community need to reframe how we view tzedakah?

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Embracing My Intern Diva

Anyone who has ever interned knows that sometimes your day consists mostly of gruntwork – you might spend hours staring at spreadsheets or organizing files, yet you’re still expected to be overjoyed by the opportunity to spend time in the “big leagues.” Luckily for me, I’ve never experienced this in my current internship with Diva Communications. Not only do I get to learn from folks at the forefront of filmmaking for social justice, I’m treated like a bona fide staff-person, rather than just a lowly intern occupying a cubicle for a few months.

Thanks to The Jewish Theological Seminary’s Fellowship in Jewish Social Entrepreneurship, I have been interning with Diva Communications since September. Diva is a one-of-a-kind, unorthodox, workaholic-natured multi-media company specializing in programming, production and post-production. The staff is dedicated to solving communication puzzles through the creative use of documentaries, news, corporate presentations and new media. They raise awareness of social issues otherwise not reported on in the mainstream media – often focusing on the intersectionality of justice-centered work and faith communities.

Diva Communications just released a documentary titled “Divine Prescription.” The film documents how people of faith can bring healing and wholeness to the lives of others through ministries of health care.  Though I missed the films debut while away on winter break, I returned to work  this semester to help promote the film’s airing on ABC network channels around the United States.

I love interning at Diva Communication because I feel as though I have the opportunity to learn something new every time I go into the office. For example, one Wednesday I was given a long list of local stations to call and ask when “Divine Prescription” would be aired – unfortunately, like many truth-tellers, our films are often relegated to the bottom of the TV schedule and air in the middle of the night. Though this task may sound like monotonous work, it certainly was not. I practiced my persuasive communication skills and learned how to advocate with a variety of different people, and was even able to get some stations to air the documentary earlier!

I am truly thankful for the time I have spent at Diva Communications thus far. It’s been incredible to see from the ground up how we can use media to raise awareness around various justice issues and build movements to address them, especially in faith communities. I look forward to continuing to learn and grow from the staff there.

What have your intern experiences been like? Leave us a comment below!

Want to learn how to leverage your creativity for the social good? Check out the Center for Artistic Activism and Paper Tiger TV, two NYC collectives that connect social activism and artistic practice. The Human Rights Watch Film Festival premiers international films on justice issues every summer. Also great is Kids Creative, an organization started by List College alum Adam Jacobs, that offers arts-based, peace education programs to students throughout the city.

Daring to Dream

What do you want to be when you grow up?

I’ve had the conversation thousands of times, with family, with friends, classmates, mentors. But never before had I had the conversation with a group of men whose lives had not been as privileged as mine has, men who have been incarcerated, homeless, and hopeless at one point or another in their lives.

There were many firsts I have found myself encountering in my internship position at Times Square Ink of Midtown Community Court.

Times Square Ink is a job training and placement assistance program that “helps participants improve decision-making skills and identity how their actions, feelings, and thoughts affect their behavior in everyday life” with the goal of presenting them with comprehensive programming that will provide them the necessary tools to enter the workforce and provide for themselves and their families.

Every six weeks we welcome a new group of men into our program, to help them process their pasts, build social support, and develop the skills needed to re-enter society with strength and healing. During the first session of each cycle, the men are posed with this question: what did you want to be when you were a child? It is such a simple answer for me. My earliest memories have me announcing to anyone who would listen that one day I was going to be the Prime Minister of Israel. Not just any Prime Minister, I was going to be like Golda Meir. Even as a young child, I saw in her the ideal of a strong and admirable woman, a determined woman who was able to create change against all odds. These were traits that at I was unable to articulate at the time, but held a power over me that lasts to this day. Yet as I sat in class with these men, sharing my own childhood dream and listening to theirs, my childhood aspiration seemed naïve and grandiose.

Participant after participant have spoken about their boyhood dreams of becoming the neighborhood pimp or the biggest drug dealer in Bronx.  One man said that all his life he wanted to be like his uncle, the neighborhood pimp, while another man spoke of always wanting to be like his father, a car mechanic, until he died from a drug overdose. Each man has his own story, and in relation my goal seemed to be somewhat silly.

Times Square Ink has given me the opportunity to work with a sector of the community that I previously had very few, if any, interactions with. Each session brings out new stories, traumas, jokes, and opportunities to learn between the men and myself, all of which force me to understand the deep-rooted complexities of their current situations.  The time I have spent at the Court has given me a larger understanding of the complexities of homelessness, the criminal justice system, and experiences of trauma.

But more importantly, my work at Midtown Community court has given me an opportunity to explore the inequalities that exist within our own communities. My experiences have forced me to question the relationship between power and privilege and how these two factors effect the communities in which we live in. It is only by understanding the roots of these issues that we can question how to break this cycle of injustice. These solutions demand that we are innovative and attempt not the easy path but rather the alternative path, and I am fortunate to have been given an opportunity to learn daily from those working on the ground how this path is forged.

Interested in hearing how other Columbia students are grappling with the Criminal Justice system? Check out information about the Beyond Bars, Moving Forward Conference happening on April 5th and 6th and featuring activists Angela Davis, Marc Lamont Hill, and  Soffiyah Elijah!

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Welcome!

Welcome to JTS Changemakers, the home of the Fellowship in Jewish Social Entrepreneurship (FJSE) at List College of The Jewish Theological Seminary. The FJSE is a year-long intensive designed to help students develop and strengthen the skills needed to become effective changemakers. We are a group of nine List College juniors and seniors working with leading social-change agencies throughout New York City. Through on-the-ground training and service we help tackle a range of issues such as environmentalism, education, hunger, criminal justice, Jewish service, and interfaith collaboration. As Fellows we also participate in a seminar designed to help cultivate connections between Judaism, activism, and professional achievements. Through reflection, peer learning, team building, and project planning, we are developing concrete ways to put our passion for Jewish social justice into action.