Tag Archives: grants

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Creating Shared Value

When most people think of “social justice,” they think of grassroots non-profit organizations with big dreams and small budgets. These people want to change the world from the ground up and are fighting against “the man” to do it. Social justice is reserved for the altruistic who believe that their lives should be devoted to helping those less fortunate than themselves, expecting little or nothing in return.

My social sustice experience is extraordinarily different from anything described above, and is rarely associated with social justice or social entrepreneurship at all. And, although it is recently making headlines most people don’t even know that it exists, and even fewer know that it serves as the engine behind many organizations in today’s social sector.

I’m talking about “corporate social responsibility,” or “CSR,” for short. CSR involves large for-profit companies “giving back” by giving money in the form of grants, in-kind donation, or giving time through employee volunteer programs. Many of this country’s largest companies give away millions of dollars a year and thousands of hours of volunteer time to help non-profit organizations all over the globe solve pressing social issues. And notably, many of these large companies approach the social sector with a keen business eye, which helps organizations run more efficiently and successfully.

Through the Fellowship in Jewish Social Entrepreneurship, I work as an intern at Alcoa Foundation. You might not have heard of Alcoa, but it’s actually one of 125 largest companies the United States, and you’ve certainly come in contact with it. Alcoa mines most of the aluminum that we use every day. If you’ve ever been in a building made with aluminum, driven a car that has aluminum, flown in an airplane, or even had a drink from a can of soda, you’ve certainly come in contact Alcoa’s product. Alcoa Foundation is also one of the biggest corporate foundations in the world, with an endowment of over $530 million. In 2012, Alcoa Foundation donated over $25 million to NGOs around the globe. Alcoa’s 61,000 worldwide employees donated 800,000 hours of their own time volunteering in their communities.

The numbers are certainly impressive, and every day during my internship I come in contact with people and organizations that have been affected by the work of Alcoa Foundation. I have come to take great pride in the work that Alcoa does to promote volunteerism and community service, and see the company as a truly responsible citizen in the for profit space.

Of course, we have to ask why. Why do companies that exist for the purpose of making money and delivering to shareholders, just give it away? Over the course of my internship, this has been the question that plagues me every day. On the one hand – and this is where things get tricky – corporations participate in philanthropic and social efforts in order to maintain what we call a “social license to operate.” Customers will associate positively with brands that are publicly giving back to their communities. And these companies aren’t shy about their own giving back. At Alcoa, for example, the Foundation features prominently on the front page of the website, even though their CSR work is such a tiny portion of what the company does. Still, Alcoa wants anyone who comes to the website to instantly see that they “give back.” Consumer-facing companies (that is, companies who sell to the general public, unlike Alcoa which only sells to other companies), create television commercials and print ads that display their philanthropic efforts.

Every year, corporate foundations get their name into the social sphere by attending benefit dinners (and paying handsomely for them), complete with their logo in the ad book. Corporations understand that they have a poor reputation – especially after the recent recession – and they use philanthropy to bolster this reputation. This depiction of CSR is cynical, and grim. Sometimes, it makes me question what I do.

But there’s an upside, and this has been my greatest takeaway from my work at Alcoa Foundation. Even if there is a PR side to CSR (and there certainly is), at the end of the day, corporations give billions and billions of dollars to charity every single year. There are a number organizations I can think of (but cannot disclose) that would simply be unable to do the work they do without the help of Alcoa Foundation. Non-profit work on any level simply cannot exist without the support of donors, corporate or personal.

This is why I am extremely proud of the work that I do at Alcoa Foundation. My social justice work involves wearing a suit and tie and working on Park Avenue. My social justice works for “the man,” not against him. And although people question the altruism of the work I do, I undoubtably engage in tikkun olam, repairing the world, one organization, one project, one employee, one dollar at a time.

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FTK – For The Kids

Every day is typically the same routine – wake up, get dressed, eat breakfast, attend classes and meetings, eat lunch, go to work, do homework, eat dinner, shower and sleep. I find that we are so caught up in our own lives that we don’t necessarily stop to think of others or appreciate the small things in life until a traumatic event or school fundraiser occurs. This is exactly what I have been struggling with all year as I participate in the Fellowship in Social Justice Entrepreneurship, through which I’ve been interning at Kids in Distressed Situations, Inc. (K.I.D.S.) since September.

K.I.D.S. is a non-profit organization that distributes new brand-name products to children and families suffering from abuse, illness, natural disasters, and poverty. We offer partner agencies a 10:1 ratio of product for every dollar donated. This semester my main responsibility at K.I.D.S. involves grants—learning how to write letters of intent and apply for specific grants. I research foundations and the grants they offer, begin establishing a partnership with the foundation, and start working on the grant application process. The grants we receive support our cause and our programs. Since our founding in 1985, K.I.D.S. has donated almost $1 billion worth of new merchandise to 70 million children and families in need across the United States and abroad. This is an extraordinary accomplishment of which I am proud to be a part; however, our efforts and work just doesn’t seem like it’s enough.

According to a report by NPR, fifteen percent of the U.S. population, meaning 46.2 million individuals, live below the federal poverty line. How can I buy a new dress or a cupcake or see a Broadway show when there are millions of people who could use that money for basic necessities such as clothes, food, shelter, education, and baby products? How can I indulge in certain luxuries after I read thank you notes from children and families who received diapers or a new pair of shoes from K.I.D.S.?

To be honest, there’s no real answer. Living a life full of guilt is no life at all, but living a life full of appreciating what you have and helping those in need is a different story. Through my internship with K.I.D.S., I hear and read about stories of young kids who see families and children suffer in the news or in their local community. These kids have then turned to their parents and ask what they can do to help. Many have organized product drives and fundraisers. Others have asked their family and friends to make a donation to K.I.D.S. in honor of their birthday rather than giving them a present. I have been so inspired by these children and my work at K.I.D.S. that I have learned the question to ask is not, “How can I not feel guilty?” but rather “How can I get people involved in our cause?” Organize a fundraiser, hold a product drive, spread the word, or volunteer. Help us expand our partnerships with foundations and local agencies, and help us expand the communities we reach. Support our cause and make a difference in the lives of millions of individuals. After all, it’s for the kids.

In its 28 years, K.I.D.S. has provided nearly $1 billion  to 70 million children. For more information, visit our website at http://www.kidsdonations.org/. Follow @kidsdonations