Tag Archives: grassroots organizing

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Welcome 2014-2015 Fellows!

Welcome back List College students!

Today is the first day of classes at JTS, but the 2014-2015 participants in our Fellowship in Jewish Social Entrepreneurship are already hard at work. The 9 fellows moved back on campus early for an intensive day-long training before classes began – and many of us have already started at our internships.

We look forward to sharing our experiences with you throughout the year. In the meantime, here’s a sneak peek into what we’ll be doing as fellows:

Moriah, intern with Accion USA, will be spending the year with the communications department of this international firm working toward financial inclusion worldwide through impact investing and microfinance services.

Sarah will be interning with Ma’yan, a Jewish feminist organization that provides leadership training to teen girls

Lauren will be the health and wellness intern at Lenox Hill Neighborhood Housea 120-year-old settlement house that provides a variety of services on Manhattan’s East Side

Jessie, intern with the New Israel Fund, is going to mobilize next-gen funders around social justice causes in Israel through a new giving-circle program.

Gilah, intern with Red Rabbit, will be teaching farm-to-table nutrition, gardening, and health in New York City schools

Becky will be interning with Jews for Racial and Economic Justice, working with the development team of this grassroots group that organizes the Jewish community to partner in citywide struggles for justice

Dani, intern with the Harlem Health Promotion Center, will be working to increase access of healthy, affordable food in the local Harlem community through Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health

Miriam will be interning at the American Jewish World Serviceworking in their campaigns and organizing department to advance the rights of women, girls and LGBTQ people in conjunction with their global We Believe campaign

Mimi, intern with Encounter, will be assisting the Programming department to increase understanding of the complexities of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, both in its manifestations in the Middle East and here in the US

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End Trafficking Now

Sex trafficking is the exploitation of human beings through either forced or coerced sex work.  Anyone involved in sex work who is under the age of 18 is considered to be trafficked.  Contrary to what the name might imply, a person does not need to be smuggled or transported from one location to another in order to be trafficked; trafficking can and does occur to individuals within their own communities.  Though every victim’s story looks different, there are several trends in trafficking narratives.  In the United States, victims are often teenage girls of color coming from broken homes, and many are tricked, coerced, or threatened into sex work by older boyfriends.  Victims often suffer from physical and emotional abuse, and find it difficult to leave the sex work either because of threats from a pimp or because of a lack of other viable options.  There is a significant population of LGBT trafficking victims, which stems from the issue of homeless LGBT youth.  While it is less common for boys to become victims of trafficking, it certainly happens and usually goes unreported.

This year my internship placement for the Fellowship in Jewish Social Entrepreneurship is with The Advocacy Lab (AdLab), an organization whose mission is to empower youth to take action around human rights.  Twice a week, I co-facilitate a human rights course in a Brooklyn public high school to help 10th graders learn advocacy tools to fight for their own rights as well as for wider humanity.  After spending the first 3 months of the year discussing human rights issues ranging from racism to child soldiers to gender discrimination to environmental injustices, a majority of my students voted to spend the rest of the school year advocating on behalf of sex trafficking victims.  The campaign is multifaceted: They will be spreading awareness of sex trafficking in their school with informational posters, a video that depicts the typical sex trafficking narratives using their own skits, poetry, and music, and a school assembly to present their project.  They will also be selling wrist-bands that say “Put an end to sex trafficking!” in order to both spread awareness and fundraise for an organization that provides support for victims.  We hope to also incorporate a political advocacy component by having them write to or call politicians demanding better support systems for trafficking victims.

Last semester, the format of the class helped me to develop my teaching skills, and this semester, coordinating the campaign has pushed me in new ways.  It’s always a challenge to find a balance between giving the students enough freedom for them to take ownership of their advocacy campaign, and providing enough structure for them to work efficiently and stay on task.  Additionally, I’m constantly thinking about ways to continue to engage and inspire the students, because we are now focusing on just one main topic for several months.  These are questions I’m still grappling with, and like many things, I’m finding that they require a good deal of trial-and-error.

The human rights lessons last semester opened our students up to a range of various human rights issues occurring at home and abroad.  This semester, one of my goals is to help them develop useful skills through running an advocacy campaign.  We taught a lesson on effective internet research and finding reliable sources, and then devoted a few class sessions to active research in the school’s computer lab.  Students found informational material to put on their awareness posters and in their video, as well as organizations that address the issue of trafficking.  A few students were assigned the task of e-mailing the organizations and asking what they might be able to do to get involved in the issue.  The Advocacy Lab provides some funding for the students’ campaign, but in order to obtain access to the money, the students must submit a grant proposal outlining the goals of the campaign and the funds they’ll need for each part.  This required students to articulate their goals and make the case for why their campaign is important.  For most students, research, outreach, and certainly writing grant proposals, was new.  It was exciting for me to see my students improve and gain efficiency each day we went to the computer lab, knowing how important these skills will be – especially for the students that go to college in a couple years.

Teaching/facilitating has been a new adventure every single day.  I am so grateful to have the opportunity to learn from my students, and share with them my own passion for human rights.

Trafficking has been in the news lately as the world cries out after nearly 300 Nigerian girls were kidnapped from a boarding school and sold into “marriage.” To learn how you can help, this article is informative: http://abcnews.go.com/US/people-world-kidnapped-nigerian-girls/story?id=23623297. To learn more about Judaism’s response to sex-trafficking, check out this AJWS D’var Tzedek written by Rabbi Lisa Gelber, Associate Dean of the JTS Rabbinical School.

Miriam Aniel (LC/Columbia '15) shows Max Tawil (LC/Columbia '15) the new composting bins. The JTS Green Team working with the Eco Reps has initiated the first residence hall composting project on campus!! — with Miriam Aniel and Max Tawil.

Guest Post: JTS EcoReps Take Action

By Eden Becker, LC’17

This year, the JTS environmental student organization, EcoReps, is revamping its eco-friendly objectives. According to the mission statement, “The JTS EcoReps are dedicated to energizing the student body of all five schools towards environmentally conscious initiatives and programming that are by the students, for the students.” This year, with a generous grant from the Jewish Greening Fellowship, a program of the UJA-Federation of New Yokr, JTS created a Green Team to expand its commitment to sustainable operations, environmental education, and building awareness through a variety of programs. Greening interns—Miriam Aniel (JP ‘15) and Nicholas Bruscato (JP ‘14) serve as liaisons between the student and faculty groups.

As far as the student group, Miriam explains, “Right now, we’re in the brainstorming stage—figuring out what green initiatives we would like to focus on, and considering how we are going to rebrand EcoReps to encourage further student involvement.” The group took its brainstorming public on November 21, by holding a school-wide event that outlined EcoReps’ activities and goals. The event served as an incubator for the community’s ideas regarding green initiatives and brought together many students, a majority from List College, who are interested in making JTS more eco-friendly.

Many of the organization’s recent plans center on making JTS residence halls greener. EcoReps created a composting initiative where food scraps are collected from dorms and delivered to local farmers’ markets on Thursdays and Sundays. “We are hoping to further encourage composting through word-of-mouth,” says Miriam. In an effort to increase Jewish engagement with the environment, Eco-Reps also plans to hold a workshop that combines Jewish learning with raising awareness about repurposing and recycling everyday materials.

EcoReps also plan to start a rooftop garden next to the JTS library, which they hope will become a prominent feature in students’ lives. The EcoReps’ initiatives are all seemingly undercut by one foundational ideal, which encourages environmental awareness to be an integral part of Jewish life. For List College students, daily engagement with EcoReps’ small green initiatives can make a big difference.

Miriam says, “We have several exciting things planned for the spring, including a project aiming to reduce our environmental impact in the residence halls, a new EcoReps leadership team, and continued communication between staff, faculty, and students to make JTS the best it can be.”

Pictured above: Miriam Aniel (LC/Columbia ’15) shows Max Tawil (LC/Columbia ’15) the new composting bins as part of a new initiative between the JTS Green Team and the EcoReps to initiate the first residence hall composting project on campus!

 

 

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Bring Passion Back

Over the last 12 weeks, I have been exploring the relationship between politics and social justice at the Advance Group, a political consulting firm in the city. I came into this internship hoping to gain some insight into how individuals and organizations committed to social good use the political process to create systematic change. However, now that I have survived the craziness of election season, I’m left with more questions than answers.

Throughout this entire experience, there were three components of the electoral process that were brought up over and over: donations, endorsements, and votes. These three make up the holy trinity of a successful political election. As a political consulting firm, it’s our job to make sure all of our clients get as many donations, endorsements, and votes as possible. Seems pretty simple, right? Actually, working on these campaigns was pretty simple. Campaigning consists of a lot of phone calls, emails, letters, flyers, posters, and canvassing.

Okay, I admit this is a grossly oversimplified explanation of what my firm does. Trust me, a lot of thought, planning, and effort is put into each campaign that we work on. And as intern with no particular expertise in New York City politics, I’m 100% positive that even more was done that I’m not aware of. So why am I saying that political campaigns are simple?

I think it’s because looking back on these twelve weeks, I’ve been dissatisfied with the disconnect that exists between elections and social change in mainstream culture. I came to this realization when passing out political literature and making phone calls on the two election days (primary election and general election). Many of the canvassers that I worked with didn’t even know anything about the candidate they were advocating for. Additionally, most of them said they didn’t vote because it didn’t matter; politics wasn’t going to make a difference in their lives. Although I felt like many voters had a strong opinion about the mayoral candidates they were voting for, most didn’t know anything about the city council candidates. When it came to these smaller, more local candidates, they were just voting for the name they recognized the most and/or the candidate affiliated with their political party.

This gets to the heart of the issue I’m struggling with. Donations, endorsements, and votes are key to winning a political race. But there’s so much more to politics. The political process is meant to be a means to ensuring liberty and justice for all. Although getting the votes in order to make change is obviously extremely important, it becomes somewhat meaningless when the votes become based on name recognition instead of values and pursuing social justice.

This is not to say that I think politics is void of social justice. That is not the case at all. Many of these candidates’ campaigns were deeply rooted in social justice values and once elected, politicians help create progress and social change.  In fact, many of these candidates started working towards change even during the election! I learned that many of my firm’s campaigns hired canvassers from the community in order to provide income to those struggling financially.

However, this does not change the fact that there seems to be a loss of political passion among “the people” when it comes to elections. With events like the government shutdown and the Zimmerman trial, many people are becoming disillusioned with politics. And with tragedies like the typhoon in the Philippines and the shootings across the U.S., many people are also becoming overwhelmed by the amount of social justice work that needs to be done. So how do we bring the passion back to these two important systems? How do we empower individuals to feel like they have access to these systems? In other words, how do we return to feeling like a government of the people by the people for the people? Like I said, I have more questions than answers. But what I do know is that political candidates and advocates for social change should work together to make political elections and social justice feel more accessible and engaging.

Thanks for a Great Year!

The 2012-2013 Fellowship in Jewish Social Entrepreneurship has come to a close. We wish this year’s fellows – Sara, Ari, Deborah, Sam A, Mirit, Dafna, Ariela, David, Sam S, and Allison – the best of luck on the next leg of their social change journeys! Please return here in the fall to celebrate the work and learning of next year’s fellows. In the meantime, below are some photos from our environmental justice tour of the South Bronx for your enjoyment. We spent a wonderful day hearing from local activists from The Point about their experience greening their community – and helped out on their urban farm.

To learn more about environmental justice issues in the South Bronx, visit The Point - a grassroots organization dedicated to youth development and the cultural and economic revitalization of Hunts Point. Sustainable South Bronx and Rocking the Boat are two other local powerhouses working to advance environmental justice while empowering young people to take a lead in their own community.

 

Ending LGBTQ Youth Homelessness

Did you know that up to 40% of the homeless youth population is gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender?

Our friend, Dr. Jama Shelton, outlines her vision for ending LGBTQ youth homelessness on The Huffington Post today. SPOILER ALERT: it involves organizing a national movement.

To learn more, head on over to Forty to None where Dr. Shelton serves as Executive Director. And, yes, it was started by that Cyndi Lauper.